MET GALA 2018 – Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination

The first Monday in May has finally arrived and we all know what that means – the biggest night in the fashion calendar year. There is no night I look forward to more than The Met Gala. It’s the night everyone awaits eagerly, refreshing their Instagram feeds on a secondly basis, looking forward to seeing who “slayed” and who was too well behaved. The Met Gala is not a night for “behaving” in terms of fashion – it’s a night for the bold and the brave, it’s a night for being, in modern day terms, “extra AF”. And that is exactly why I love it so much.

So what exactly is the Met Gala? Formerly known as The Costume Institute Gala, and held at the Metropolitan’s Museum of Art, it’s the biggest night in the fashion fundraising calendar year. The first ever gala was held way back in 1948, making this year the event’s 70th anniversary. It was founded by publicist Eleanor Lambert but since 1995, the fashion world’s reigning queen – Anna Wintour has chaired the event. Each year Anna will choose fellow celebrities to co-chair the event with her. This year’s chosen few were Donatella Versace, Amal Clooney and Rihanna. Riri being chosen didn’t come as much of a shock to many as she is quite literally in a committed relationship with the Gala and goes above and beyond each year to make sure her look is the headturner of the night. This year was certainly no different!

The night itself is divided into three main parts. The night begins with walking the red carpet up those famous Met steps, followed by taking in the breathtaking exhibition before being seated for dinner and a star studded performance.

This years theme, Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination, is one of the most controversial themes to date. Directed and curated by the notable Andrew Bolton, it is set to be one hell of an exhibition. Vogue reported that Bolton is said to have visited the Vatican over ten times to secure pieces that have never before left the independent state. Who want’s to buy me a return flight from Melbourne to New York so I can see it for myself?! While I’m definitely not the Catholic Churches biggest fan, I will admit that they provide plenty of inspiration when it comes to the world of fashion. Lest we forget Dolce & Gabbana’s AW 2013 runway collection – exuberance and excessiveness at it’s best.

Okay, so enough of me waffling on. Let’s get to the good stuff.

Here’s my top 21 looks (I couldn’t whittle it down to any less!)

Rihanna in Maison Margiela.

 

Amal Clooney in Richard Quinn. 

 

Rosie Huntington- Whiteley in Ralph Lauren.

 

Stella Maxwell in Moschino by Jeremy Scott.

 

Miley Cyrus in Stella McCartney.

 

Jennifer Lopez in Balmain.

 

Anna Wintour in Chanel.

 

Emma Stone in Louis Vuitton.

 

Jourdan Dunn in Diane von Furstenberg.

 

Priyanka Chopra in Ralph Lauren.

 

Jasmine Sanders in H&M.

 

Kate Bosworth in Oscar de la Renta.

 

Lily Collins in Givenchy.

Kendall Jenner in Off-White.

 

Zoe Kravitz in Saint Laurent by Anthony Vacarello.

 

Ariana Grande in Vera Wang.

 

Bella Hadid in Chrome Hearts.

 

Hailey Baldwin in Tommy Hilfiger.

 

Olivia Munn in H&M.

 

Bee Shaffer in Valentino.

 

Blake Lively in Versace.

 

I really think everyone pulled it out of the bag this year. There was, as always, a few dodgy ensembles…I’m looking your way Katy Perry, but for the most part, I was really impressed with this years looks. Amal Clooney in Richard Quinn was probably my highlight with Zoe Kravitz in Saint Laurent a close second. Other favourites included Blake Lively, who never gets it wrong and Stella Maxwell who positively slayed in a Jeremy original. Kendall’s look was probably a bit boring for the night and safe for my taste but she kept true to herself so she made the list for that reason. Plus, as much as I may slate her, I would kill to look that good in an all white jumpsuit. I was positively gutted with Kate Moss’ attempt, which if you know me, pains me to say.

What was your favourite look?

Gotta Dash,

Edel x

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